Marxist Sociology Blog: Theory, research, politics2018-10-24T10:00:29-04:00

Ideas and Family Ties: Understanding why English-Speaking Countries Responded So Differently to the Crisis of the 1930s

My explanation of the economic policy variation (convergence and divergence) across the five cases gives primacy to ruling parties’ ideational orientation and political strategies concerning three major groups of interest – business, labour, and agrarian. Where governments privileged businesses and accommodated agrarians to the exclusion of labour, the policy outcome was invariably conservative. In contrast, where governments arranged a rapprochement between agrarians, organized labour, and sections of business, policy innovation followed.

By |Jan 19, 2022|Categories: Research|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Ideas and Family Ties: Understanding why English-Speaking Countries Responded So Differently to the Crisis of the 1930s

Send in your nominations for the 2022 Marxist Sociology Section Awards

The Marxist Sociology Teaching and Praxis Award

The Marxist Sociology Teaching and Praxis Award recognizes outstanding integration of theory and practice in the promotion and achievement of social change through teaching and scholarship by sociologists. We look for nominees who have excellent accomplishments in teaching Marxist sociology and/or have successfully blended Marxist scholarship with activism. This may involve (but is not limited to) activism, organizing, and/or outreach to encourage/facilitate social change. Nominations should include a letter of support for the nominee and other supporting materials. Self-nominations are acceptable but nominations by others are highly recommended.

Supporting materials include:

  • CV
  • Teaching materials (such as syllabi, and teaching statements, and creative assignments geared towards public engagements) and public scholarship materials especially materials geared towards the public and progressive movements.
  • At least one letter from a former student or mentee and or community organizations and social movements.
  • Any other supporting materials such as news articles or local or national news coverage.

The deadline for receipt of all materials is March 1, 2022. Please send materials to all committee members.

The Marxist Sociology Teaching and Praxis Award Committee for 2022:

 

Paul Sweezy Marxist Sociology Book Award

The Sweezy […]

By |Jan 13, 2022|Categories: Blog article|Comments Off on Send in your nominations for the 2022 Marxist Sociology Section Awards

Labor Power and Wages after Women’s Labor Market Incorporation in Argentina

In the past years, there has been a very much welcomed flourishing of Marxist Feminist analyses. In a recent article, we contribute to the ongoing discussion by elaborating on Marx’s concept of the value of labor power to conceptualize the massive incorporation of women into the labor market and its consequences in terms of wages in Argentina since the mid-seventies.

The literature on the value of labor power has typically focused on the reproduction of labor power, which consists of the consumption of the means of subsistence required to replenish (paid) workers’ expenditure of brains, nerves, and muscles so they can put in motion the labor capacity required by the production process the next workday. Marxist Feminists have highlighted that (paid) workers also need to be cared for, their food cooked, and that most of the many additional essential domestic tasks are typically done by women without payment.

However, the value of labor power also involves the production of labor power sellers to satisfy the demands imposed by the permanent valorization of capital. Analytically, this requires two things: the biological reproduction of the species (having kids, feeding them, caring for them, etc) and the transformation of those individuals into (paid) workers […]

By |Jan 12, 2022|Categories: Blog article, Research|Comments Off on Labor Power and Wages after Women’s Labor Market Incorporation in Argentina

2021 Year-End Round Up

To start off the New Year, we would like to share the 10 most read posts on the Marxist Sociology Blog published in 2021. Congratulations to all of our contributors! If you missed these posts the first time around, now would be a great time to give them a quick read.

Looking ahead, we are excited to continue showcasing the important work of section members, broadening the pool of MSB contributors, and publishing insightful and accessible Marxist commentary and analysis. Please get in touch with a member of the editorial team if you are interested in contributing to MSB!

Top ten most read posts of 2021:

  1. Cody Melcher / The Wages of Whiteness or White Fragility? W.E.B. DuBois and the Enduring Problem of Interracial Unionism
  2. Stale Holgersen / Spatial Planning and Marxism
  3. Eric Blanc / Rethinking the Russian Revolution from Across the Empire
  4. Elaine Sio-ieng Hui / The Organic Intellectuals in China
  5. Beth Mintz / Neoliberalism and the Crisis of Higher Education
  6. Alessandra Mezzadri / Informal Employment and the Social Reproduction of Value
  7. Aaron Major / Remembering Richard Lachmann: A Political Sociologist with a Message for the Left
  8. Ya-Wen Lei / From Factories to […]
By |Jan 5, 2022|Categories: Blog article, Commentary|Comments Off on 2021 Year-End Round Up

A global platform left the country and local gig workers were left stranded

Gig platforms have tried hard to create the image of gig workers as side-hustlers, part-timers, or those who use the work as a hobby to make extra money and who are thus free to hop from one platform to another whenever they want. If gig workers are deemed to be so autonomous and independent, what happens to them when a global platform leaves?

By |Dec 15, 2021|Categories: Blog article, Research|Tags: , , , , |Comments Off on A global platform left the country and local gig workers were left stranded
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