Marxist Sociology Blog: Theory, research, politics2018-10-24T10:00:29-04:00

Whatever the Result, This Election is not the End of Trumpism

Regardless of the results, what we know for sure is that the 2020 election will not signal the end of Trumpism, even if, as appears increasingly likely, Trump himself ends up losing the election. Despite his rank incompetence and callousness in the face of the pandemic and economic crisis, which eroded his support somewhat, he has retained the support of a significant minority of American voters. Thanks to a wildly undemocratic electoral system, it’s still possible that this minority will allow him to stay in power (there is no scenario at this point in which Trump wins the national popular vote). But even with a Biden win, Trump’s base isn’t going anywhere.

By |Nov 4, 2020|Categories: Blog article, Commentary|Comments Off on Whatever the Result, This Election is not the End of Trumpism

Property Dimensions and Ecological Preservation

Contrary to the classical sociological tradition of Marx, Durkheim, and Weber, Margaret Thatcher famously proclaimed that “there is no such thing as society.”

Similarly mainstream economics assumes the basic unit of individuals and individual private property as the foundation of the market system.  Drawing upon her mentor Friedrich von Hayek, Thatcher presumed that markets were sufficient to provide information to manage the modern economy.  Hayek stressed that the market provided superior knowledge, more encompassing than whatever could be accumulated by any single human person.

Even in the age of the internet, social media, big data, and artificial intelligence, many modern economists, such as Gary Becker and Alvin Roth, still rely on the market for optimal management.  Markets are presumed to be everywhere, and, if not already in existence, should be created.

This is all the more remarkable since the unit of individual private property is bounded, like a discreet parcel of land delineated by its borders.  The right to exclude non-owners presumably provides the owner with an incentive to make the best use of his own private property, to increase his own private wealth.  In this sense, the right to exclude presumably makes property more productive.

This argument regarding the efficacy of property originated […]

By |Oct 28, 2020|Categories: Blog article, Theory|Comments Off on Property Dimensions and Ecological Preservation

Gender, Class, and the Gig Economy

We argue, in short, that what Marxist-feminist Temma Kaplan labeled female—as opposed to feminist—consciousness is fully compatible with a stance of working-class antagonism to company bosses and class-privileged customers.

By |Oct 21, 2020|Categories: Blog article, Commentary, Research|Comments Off on Gender, Class, and the Gig Economy

The Limits of State Capitalism on China’s Bid for Hegemony

Much of the current discourse on China’s rise significantly overstates its economic might. China’s model of state capitalism and the dynamics of globalization have contributed to its rapid development over the past four decades. Yet these same factors circumscribe its hegemonic potential.

By |Oct 14, 2020|Categories: Blog article, Commentary, Research, Theory|Comments Off on The Limits of State Capitalism on China’s Bid for Hegemony

Graduate Student Worker Organizational Stability in the Twilight Hour of Neoliberalism

While it won a historic contract in 2014, ultimately, the graduate student worker organizational process failed to stabilize into a lasting organizational formation. Understanding the reasons for this helps us to understand the broader structural and contingent problems that worker organizers face in the current conjuncture both in and beyond the university.

By |Oct 7, 2020|Categories: Blog article, Commentary, Research|Comments Off on Graduate Student Worker Organizational Stability in the Twilight Hour of Neoliberalism
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