Substantive short articles on Marxian sociology

Autogestión: Origins and activism from Algerian revolution to Mexico City punk

The history of autogestión demonstrates how academic discourses and pieces of political ideologies circulate and are rearticulated with incredible and unpredictable momentum around the world. Scholarship (even excellent, well-meaning, and even politically committed scholarship) reorganizes this coeval churning of continual mutual influence to obscure some connections and exaggerate others. Prestige scholarship systematically ignores and erases how activism, popular culture, and scholarship from the Global South influence and are appropriated by European and North American scholars. Autogestión, a term I argue was coined by North African revolutionaries, becomes displaced and expropriated to Yugoslavia. In other words, scholarship is very often a process of accumulation by dispossession.

By |2023-02-08T08:33:34-05:00Feb 8, 2023|

Union advantage? Most workers in Niagara don’t see it that way

Why don’t people always act in their own collective self-interest? This classic puzzle in sociological analysis led us to question why so many workers – even the most precarious among them – were so disinterested in unions as a means to achieve higher pay and better working conditions.  If [...]

By |2023-01-25T12:05:52-05:00Jan 25, 2023|

Way Back on Land Back: Company colonies in Early North American Capitalism

The US 1619 project is aimed at making visible the erasure of Black history and contributions of Africans to early America. Seldom noted, it was the Virginia Company that directed the labour of Africans first arriving on the White Lion that year – Virginia was not merely a generic [...]

By |2023-01-18T22:01:12-05:00Jan 18, 2023|

Bringing Capital Back Again In Slavery and Abolition

Value did not destroy slavery, human actions did. My point is that those actions were mediated by value relations. It is high time to see capital in history again both in past and present. Perhaps all the more so now, that the combined crises of world democracy, world governance and global ecology demand collective action, but collective action seems insufficient to resolve them on its own.

By |2023-01-11T11:06:51-05:00Jan 11, 2023|

Marketization and class discipline in European political economy

In our new book, we theorise the political economy of marketization in Europe, based on hundreds of interviews with policymakers, businesses, trade unionists, administrators, and more, from various countries and industries. Our central argument is that attempts to extend and intensify principles of market competition in 21st century Europe have tended to shift the balance of power in workplaces away from labour and towards capital, while also shielding market governance from democratic oversight.

By |2022-12-14T15:55:25-05:00Dec 14, 2022|

Can Union Caucuses Change the World?

In March 2020, New York City became the U.S. epicenter of the emerging Covid-19 crisis. Yet neither city leaders, nor school district officials, nor teacher union leadership provided a meaningful response to a mounting public health crisis. Instead, the city’s fledgling social justice teachers’ union caucus, MORE, rose to [...]

By |2022-12-07T16:28:50-05:00Dec 7, 2022|

Can Fixed Duration Strikes Work?

On September 12th, 2022, approximately 15,000 nurses went on strike across Minnesota and Wisconsin in one of the largest private sector work stoppages by nurses in U.S. history. Workers demanded increased staffing and higher wages to retain nurses after working for over two years through a deadly pandemic. In [...]

By |2022-11-30T06:59:12-05:00Nov 30, 2022|
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